Primalgirl Reads: The Primal Connection by Mark Sisson

I was thrilled to recieve my advance copy of Mark Sisson’s latest book in The Primal Blueprint series, The Primal Connection: Follow Your Genetic Blueprint to Health and Happiness, last week for several reasons. First (and foremost), I was interested in seeing how Mark interpreted a topic that should resonate with us all at our core. Second, I was curious to see how the book was laid out, seeing as I’m writing a very similar book myself. (Thankfully, Mark has covered the bigger topics I haven’t, and my book may end up being a great companion to this one.) Third, I was excited for people to actually read this book and start making changes in their lives — changes that would make it easier for me to interact with them, to connect on a deeper level and to form tribes based on shared human experiences instead of the latest model of a designer purse or the shared love of Nikon cameras.

Why I Need This Book

I’ve been feeling majorly disconnected from modern society for about four years now — about the same length of time that I’ve been Primal. I’ve lost touch with many friends, as I no longer have much in common with them. When I started eating and exercising the way my genes expected me to, something deep in the recesses of my brain woke up. I started questioning why I did everything that I did: Why did I feel the need for a bigger house? What role was television playing in my life? Why did I want to be surrounded by people at certain times and completely alone at other times? Why did I suddenly hate video games and everyone who played them for hours on end — the only ‘social’ interaction they had all day? Why was I depressed after looking at Facebook? Didn’t I have over 500 friends on there? Shouldn’t I be happy to see what was going on in everyone’s lives, including people I haven’t seen since third grade and honestly haven’t thought about since then?

Never before have we been this connected and yet this lonely and isolated. Admit it: we ALL feel it. Something is wrong. Something is off. Something is missing. We were meant for something more. We’ve missed our calling. Something isn’t right.

Our Missing Primal Connection

Mark Sisson addresses this modern societal phenomena in his latest book in the Primal Blueprint series, The Primal Connection. The Primal Connections are organized into six categories in the book:

  • Inner Dialogue: Ten Habits of Highly Successful Hunter-Gatherers and how to implement them in your life.
  • Body: The body and mind influence each other in ways we’re only now beginning to understand. Relearn how to sit, stand, walk and move.
  • Nature: We are hardwired to encounter the sights, sounds, scents and sensations found in nature. Find ways to reconnect with it.
  • Daily Rhythm: Honor your circadian rhythm and use technology without it consuming you.
  • Social: We are wired for meaningful personal relationships. Learn how to create them.
  • Play: Playing is how we learn. Learn how to play without any attachment to the outcome and free yourself.

This book is beautifully laid out and easy to read. There are concrete steps and ideas on how to reconnect with ourselves and how to live simple, happy lives while still embracing modern conveniences and technology. What I like most about Mark Sisson is that he has always been about combining modern society with what our caveman brains expect and need to thrive. This book isn’t about breaking off from society and culture, living in a mountainside cave, wearing bear skins and shunning everyone you’ve ever met (which, I have to admit, does sound good to me on days like Black Friday. Just sayin’.). Instead, it’s about “honoring our ancient genetic recipe for health while still enjoying the comfort and convenience of modern life.”

This is a great book to take with you on a retreat, or to read on the train while you commute to work. It will make you think. It will make you aware. And, if Mark has done his job right, it should make you happier, more connected to the world around you and to your inner caveman. Grok on.

SPECIAL DEAL!

For the next two days only (until Thursday, January 10th, 2013), Mark is giving away special bonus packages and giveaways when you order the book. You can click on the links above, order from his site, from a book store — it doesn’t matter. Click here for more information on the exclusive goodies you will receive if you buy The Primal Connection within the next two days.


Comments

Primalgirl Reads: The Primal Connection by Mark Sisson — 10 Comments

  1. Pingback: Primalgirl Reads: The Primal Connection by Mark Sisson | Paleo Digest

  2. I hear you, Tara!

    Your story was my key inspiration to try Paleo – with great results (you can see my story at PamelasPaleoLife.com). I’ve had similar social experiences since then as well. You have been at it much longer than I, so I appreciate your guidance. Please continue to share on this topic – and good luck on your new seminar opportunity!

    I am SO excited to read this book! (Just downloaded it this morning.)

    • Thanks Pamela! I think this book is going to help those of us that have been feeling disconnected. At least we can connect with each other, ha ha. Nice blog and way to go! Paying it forward is the best thing we can do. :)

      • I think the change in social dynamics is the BIGGEST obstacle people face in adopting the Paleo lifestyle. And members of the Paleo community have not been sharing enough about how to cope with this.

        You said it so well in an interview for PaleoNonPaleo, how people change when you do. How you lose friends because you’re no longer convenient to be around. How they feel uncomfortable because your success brings their choices into greater focus – and they don’t like what they see. Jealousy and sabotage abounds. It goes on and on, and most people just don’t have the fortitude to withstand the pressure to conform. So they fall off the wagon. I have a couple friends making the transition and I am making every effort to support them through that tough issue, and it’s a daunting task. But they’re worth it!

        Thanks! Looking forward to your book as well. When is it due to publish?

        • Thank you! The book shouldn’t be too much longer, I’ve been given a deadline of Jan 30 to complete writing then it will go to editing, etc. before publication. I think it’s going to be an E-book so we won’t have to wait long.

          I think I’m going to do an entire post on the change in social dynamics. You’re right, it’s a huge obstacle and we don’t talk about it enough. :)

  3. Wow, thought I must be the only one that hated Facebook because always felt depressed after viewing. It does help me see people in a different light though, which is not necessarily a good one. Most of these people I don’t want to bother with now that I know so much about them. I am starting to think maybe we are becoming too connected and that is the problem. Or maybe its just too much information about people we know. FB plays off people’s egos and that doesn’t always bring out the best in a person.

    I look forward to Mark’s and your book as well. Paleo is an ongoing struggle for me. Can’t seem to give up the bread!!

    • No, you’re not the only one. Out of everyone I’ve talked to, only one person has said that they actually like Facebook. They, however, have their account set up so they 1. only see their favorite people, 2. only post meaningless videos and links to news articles and 3. still call/talk to their best friends in person instead of FB messaging them.

      Everyone else I’ve talked to (especially women) says that FB makes them depressed, isolated and lonely. They also feel like everyone else’s life is more exciting and better than theirs.

      Facebook is like a reverse tabloid! We only see what others want us to see, not the day to day drudgery of their lives, which are no better than ours. They don’t post pictures of themselves sitting in their pajamas until 3 p.m. or cleaning up dog vomit — no, we only see pictures of their new boat, or house, or kids, or that weekend they went out for drinks with someone else they’re friends with on FB and tagged the shit out of them.

      I think things get particularly bad around election time — all of a sudden, we find out people we thought were really cool and “just like us” have polarized, completely opposite views of what we believe in. My grandmother told me to never talk about politics or religion with people that I wanted to stay friends with, but FB hasn’t given us a choice in that matter anymore.

      The bread thing is a hard habit to break. Just pay close attention to how your body feels afterwards and it might be easier to say no to next time. :)

      • Out of all my 60+ FB friends, I now know that some are completely delusional, others are total egomaniacs, one has to be psychotic, one is a better-than-thou religious zealot who preaches every day, two have serious anger issues and are venting constantly, one is a scarily closed minded political zealot, and one is a major hypocrite who is obsessed with cutesy shallow things. Out of all, I only see two in a better light than I did before, and one is as I expected. The others were a complete surprise to me, and some are people I thought I knew very well! I do find this part of FB kind of fascinating… but does make me want to reach for the bread and move to a cave in the mountains somewhere! lol.

        • ha ha, you have no idea how much I hate most of the people on Facebook. I love them in person, in real life, but they become fanatical bores and zealots online. Not everyone needs to see pictures of your lunch. I don’t want to know what you really think about abortion. I don’t care that you “like” a pair of earrings or what song you are listening to at the moment. I. Don’t. Care. I really don’t.

          :) Do you have the cave in the mountains picked out yet? Can I suggest the Andes? I’ve heard it’s fairly remote and there is no WiFi. I’m seriously considering starting my own commune somewhere in the wastelands of Montana.

          • You’re welcome in Montana anytime! I sure wouldn’t mind. Missoula to be more clear :) Montana is my home and my hiding place. I truly believe I live in the best city in America and I have lived all over. So come on up/over/down. Primal family is always welcome.

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